REMOTE COLLABORATION AND EVIDENCE-BASED CARE

 

 

·       For this assessment, you are a presenter. References: Cite at least three professional or scholarly sources of evidence to support the assertions you make in your video. Include additional properly cited references as necessary to support your statements.

·       APA reference page: Submit a correctly formatted APA reference page that shows all the sources you used to create and deliver your video. Be sure to format the reference page according to current APA style.

·       

1.Propose an evidence-based care plan that you believe will improve the safety and outcomes of the patient in Remote Collaboration on Evidence-Based Care media scenario. explain the ways in which an evidence-based practice model was used to help develop the care plan for

2.Discuss the ways in which an EBP model and relevant evidence helped you to develop and make decision about the plan you proposed.

3. Apply an evidence-based practice model to address a practice issue. Explain the ways in which an EBP model was used to help develop the care plan. Plan care based on the best available evidence. Propose an evidence-based care plan to improve the safety and outcomes for a patient. Reflect on which evidence was most relevant and useful when making decisions regarding the care plan

4. identify benefits and strategies to mitigate the challenges of interdisciplinary collaboration to plan care within the context of a remote team identifying the benefits of the remote collaboration in the scenario, as well as discuss strategies you found in the literature or best practices that could help mitigate or overcome one or more of the collaboration challenges you observed in the scenario

 

Care media scenario

Dr. Copeland: Nurse, can you give me an update on Caitlynn? I know she’s two years old and she’s been admitted for pneumonia. Does she have any history of breathing problems?

Virginia Anderson: Yes, this is her second admission for pneumonia in the last six months. She had a meconium ileus at birth.

Dr. Copeland: All right. Is she presenting with any other symptoms?

Virginia Anderson: She has decreased breath sounds at the right bases and rhonchi scattered in the upper lobes. Respirations are 32 and shallow with a temp of 101.

Dr. Copeland: What have we done for her so far?

Virginia Anderson: The respiratory therapist administered nebulized aerosol and chest physiotherapy. After the aerosol she had thick secretions.

Dr. Copeland: I see her weight is 20.7 pounds, and there’s been some decreased subcutaneous tissue observed in her extremities?

Virginia Anderson: Correct. I noticed this too, so she might have some malabsorption of nutrients.

Dr. Copeland: Have we done a sweat chloride test yet?

Virginia Anderson: Yes, and the results were 65 milliequivalents per liter. Also, the mother reports that when she kisses her, she tastes salty.

Dr. Copeland: All right. Well, I think it’s fair to say we might be dealing with cystic fibrosis here. Let’s get her started on an IV with piperacillin, and keep an eye on her temperature.

Dr. Copeland: Let’s talk about Caitlynn Bergan. Her mother, uh, [checks notes] Janice, has been informed of her diagnosis. I didn’t realize this when she first came in, but she doesn’t live in Valley City; she’s in McHenry.

Rebecca Helgo: That’s a tough drive during winter. They’re over an hour away, aren’t they?

Dr. Copeland: That’s right. It was a toss-up between coming here or going to Jamestown, but I guess the father — Doug — thought Valley City was the better choice. Anyway, I’ve put her on Pancrease enzymes and we’ll be recommending a high-protein, extra-calorie diet along with the fat-soluble vitamins — A, D, E, and K. I’ll update her pediatrician on her condition, and order dornase alfa. Let’s see how she does with the breathing treatments. How are those going?

Rebecca Helgo: Quite well, actually. She’s too young to get her to do the huff breaths, but we’re keeping the secretions thin and manageable with the aerosol treatments. I am concerned about her day-to-day treatment, though. She’ll be back here with pneumonia if the parents can’t stay on top of that. She’s at risk for impaired gas exchange and respiratory distress, which will cause her anxiety and more distress, and that’s not going to help her stay well.

Dr. Copeland: How well do you think the parents will be able to handle the treatment?

Virginia Anderson: That might get tricky. I gather that the mother and father are still married but separated. We’ll need to make sure that at least one of them gets the education they need. But they both work, and trips here aren’t the easiest choice. We should get a social services consult to coordinate services and identify some assistance for the family in McHenry.

Rebecca Helgo: I can do some education here, and then do a Skype consult with one or both of them once she’s been discharged and is back home.

Dr. Copeland: It sounded like both parents work long hours. Are you going to be able to schedule times that work?

Rebecca Helgo: I may have to do some after-hours appointments. We’ll have to sort that out.

Virginia Anderson: She’s had one bowel obstruction already, so I think we need to help them monitor for DIOS too. Does the pediatrician’s office have a telemedicine relationship with us? That might be helpful in preventing unnecessary trips here.

Dr. Copeland: Let’s find out a bit more and see what our options are.

Dr. Copeland: Hello, Dr. Benjamin. I’m sorry to be meeting under such circumstances, but I hope we can work with you to help the Bergans handle Caitlynn’s care. On the line with me is Virginia Anderson, the nurse assigned to Caitlynn while she’s here.

Dr. Benjamin: Hello to both of you. Yes, it’s unfortunate. This is the first case I’ve seen among my own patients.

Dr. Copeland: Are you familiar with the CF protocol?

Dr. Benjamin: I am, but I’d love to get any more details that relate to Caitlynn. She’s done with most of her immunizations, but she’s still needs her HAV and influenza, of course. I’m also not sure where to order some of the pancreatic enzymes and medications you listed.

Virginia Anderson: We can help with all that. Do you have telemedicine access to Valley City?

Dr. Benjamin: No, but we do have it with Cooperstown Medical Center. We kind of have to in a town of less than 100 people.

Dr. Copeland: We may be able to use Skype on a more informal basis for consults between us, but it might be good to get connected with Valley City on your telemedicine equipment. If the parents bring Caitlynn to you with symptoms, and you’re not sure whether the hour-long trip is necessary, we can do a telemedicine appointment and make sure.

Dr. Benjamin: All right. It sounds like we might see them often initially, and I understand that bowel obstructions and pneumonia are two possible complications. We can handle some of those issues here, but assuming they have trouble during working hours, I assume we can reach you by phone?

Dr. Copeland: You or your staff can send me a text. If we need to talk further we can set up a call, but if not, text is the quickest way to get my attention, and the easiest way for me to respond between things.

Virginia Anderson: And I’m available via text as well if you’re having trouble reaching Dr. Copeland or if it’s a question I can field.